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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 48-63

Ergonomics and work-related musculoskeletal disorders in ophthalmic practice


Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Waleed Abdulaziz Alrashed
Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, P. O. Box: 305077, Riyadh 11361
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijas.ijas_24_16

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Purpose: To increase the awareness of eye health care providers about Work related musculoskeletal disorders and proper ergonomics. Method: Literatures review of all aspect of work related musculoskeletal disorders and ergonomics pertaining to heath care in general and particularly to eye care providers. Results: Work related Musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD's) among health care workers including Physicians, nurses, dental hygienist, and Custodial worker are well known. In the last two decades WRMSD's and related problems have being substantiated by different studies on the above mention groups, and in particular Ophthalmologists along with dentists and some surgical subspecialties (Laparoscope surgeons and Ear, Nose, and Throat surgeons). It was attributed to the specific nature of the job which requires prolonged awkward position and repetition. In these series of four articles will try to highlight the most important areas where health care providers especially the ophthalmologist should take care and aware of to prevent or at least reduce the WRMSD's. These areas involve: in the work and outside of work activities and include: (A) Clinic: The proper way of conducting slit lamp examination with or without the use of different lenses. How to perform direct and indirect ophthalmoscopes with the least stressful way to cervical and lumbar spine (will be covered in part 2 of this review). (B) Work station and office: How to set in proper way and how to select ergonomic and comfortable chair, tables, mouse, keyboard, screen and foot rest (will be covered in part 2 of this review). Also computer vision syndrome (will be discussed in part 4 of this review). (C) Operating room: Tips in how to adjust surgeon chair, microscope, and operating table to achieve the best ergonomic position. Also hints in the proper way of selecting and using surgical loupes (will be covered in part 2 of this review). (D) Outside the Hospital: Advises in the proper way of using portable visual display devices (smart phones and tablets etc…) along with hints on how to sit while driving and how to sleep with the least stress to the back and neck(will be covered in part 3 of this review). Conclusion: Adopting a healthy neutral posture and along with the comply of basic ergonomics principles in different areas of ophthalmic works early in the medical career (i.e. Residency) along with maintaining regular muscles stretches and exercise will reduce those unwanted Musculoskeletal squeals and hopefully leading to prolonged and productive healthy career life.


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